An Elusive Solution

20160817_102352Every time I’m ready to share a post I pause and have second thoughts about hitting the ‘publish’ button. The hesitation comes from a fleeting thought that I’m still on the same topic, ‘living with ABI’. The notion that haunts me is ‘how about a new topic.’

What makes me ‘unpause’ and share once again is remembering those who tell me I’ve helped them understand something about themselves. What seems mundane to me, because I live it every day, offers some enlightenment to someone else. Even though readers let me know, that pause still haunts me.

Brain Fatigue is _______ ?

What extends the pause a bit longer are the times when I’m experiencing difficult days. For me a difficult day is experiencing a loss of energy, usually in the form of brain fatigue. That’s what I’m experiencing this week. I call it brain fatigue because I’m not able to describe what is really going on. I experience a build up of pressure in my head. I don’t feel fully alert. I feel a level of anxiety that lacks a focus. This is a partial explanation. The fatigue is a manifestation of other processes in the brain that are taking a back seat.

Manifestations

As part of the brain fatigue I notice a setback in my ability to remember. I find myself once again searching for the right word – usually it’s the nouns that go missing in action, or innocently show up late. I once again find myself forgetting what I set out to do, losing my train of thought, losing focus partway through someone sharing a thought or experience – appearing rude and yes, feeling somewhat annoyed with myself.

Part of the brain fatigue is that it puts me at risk of nightmares. Impressionable events that happen during the day have a likelihood of invading my sleep and forming the background to a story that I would prefer to extricate myself from. The brain fatigue adds a complicating factor of losing my ability to distinguish between reality and dream. So I’m totally unaware that there’s an exit button – it should be labeled “Nightmare exit”.

As part of the brain fatigue my physical agility experiences a set back as well. Walking once again becomes more challenging – keeping my balance on uneven terrain becomes unpleasant, before starting down a set of stairs I hesitate, making sure I’m properly oriented. Loss of agility somehow translates into being unable to relax my body. Getting proper sleep goes out the window because I’m not able to relax – each night being only a partial benefit, then waking up in the morning feeling like I’ve completed a marathon – though sometimes I’ve only slept long enough to have run a partial marathon.

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Signage for the Labyrinth at Collingwood Arboretum

Managing to get a two hour sleep (can’t really call it a nap) later in the day is helpful though it means finding the initiative to navigate the groggy re-emergence from sleep. Finding my way to a reasonable semblance of consciousness can feel like moving through a maze. Doing it twice in one day doesn’t lead to a greater level of familiarity because each time the maze has a few new turns and switchbacks.

After a couple days of brain fatigue a combination of frustration and disappointment begins to set in. This makes me inclined to withdraw and shut out much of the world – a smaller world feels more comfortable. While a smaller world has greater appeal my experience prompts me to look in the opposite direction. So I tenuously venture out.

Venturing out

Today, I chose to spend a couple hours with my four year old grandson. When I arrived he first sat with me as we tackled a crossword puzzle he had started. He was excited to eventually have figured out a dozen clues and filled them in. This was followed by a couple games of chess. Then he very much wanted to play Stratego (TM) and very pleased with himself when he won. What wore me down was helping him design and build a layout with his wooden train track.

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Daily crossword puzzle

Spending time with him like this is both very motivating while also physically draining. His eagerness to do and learn propels me beyond my immediate condition and share in his sense of wonder and excitement. When I told my grandson I was getting tired he helpfully suggested that I read him a book. After he chose a book he changed his mind and offered to read it to me. After reading it twice he went on to discuss some of his reading exploits.

Catch 22

Meanwhile the recurrence of mental fatigue keeps me from doing some of the things I want to do. The maintenance items that beg my attention continue to wait. Some of the repairs which would have been easy to do pre-ABI are much harder to plan and complete.

Hopefully I’ll get a good night’s sleep in the next day or two. That will be a signal that my brain fatigue is subsiding. At the same  time, proper sleep is key to minimizing the brain fatigue. It becomes a ‘Catch 22’ situation; I need the sleep to clear the brain fatigue, but the brain fatigue needs to clear so I can get some good sleep.

One activity that seems to help me reduce the brain fatigue is cycling. It’s repetitive and things happen slowly – much slower than driving a car. While it’s repetitive, it’s not a boring activity. The scenery changes and I’m moving at a pace that enables me to see things that are just a blur when I’m traveling by car. At this time of the year I’ve been able to scout out some wild grapes that have sized up nicely or spotted some abandoned trees with apples begging to be picked.

Cycling, or an activity like that, involves using all my muscle groups. Walking would accomplish the same but I prefer the scenery to change a bit faster. By exercising my muscles it makes it easier to relax when I lie down. The beauty of cycling is that I can make it as easy or as strenuous as I like. Running is not an option as the jarring motion of each step causes a headache to surface in short order.

In working with my brain coach, the goal is to avoid sensory overload which easily leads to brain fatigue. I’ve been coached to become my own detective in recognizing which activities contribute to sensory overload. What puzzles me is that I’ve been unable to determine the cause of my most recent encounter with brain fatigue. And so the detective work continues. And so the training with my brain coach continues.Intriguing and a blessing.

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Author: Jasper Hoogendam

After 36 years as an educator my career ended due to a TBI. Renewable energy as part of 'walking lightly on this earth' has been and continues to be my interest since my teen years. Since early 2015 I have been learning to live with ABI (Acquire Brain Injury). I don't want to let my ABI limit the goals I set for myself. I'm living with a different brain, not a lesser brain. In sharing my day to day successes and struggles, I am better able to understand how my life had changed and begin to accept the change. In sharing my experiences I'm hearing from caregivers and fellow ABI's. I'm encouraged when my experiences are helping others understand some of the complexity of living with ABI.

4 thoughts on “An Elusive Solution”

  1. You help me to understand ABI. In addition, it helps me have compassion for strangers who seem to be “out of sorts.” I am starting to tell myself little stories about their lives to flesh them out for me. It is a way to initiate compassion. (For example, a grumpy cashier. I tell myself: She has a sick child who kept her up all night. In addition, someone called off from work, and she had to come in on her day off. My response to my fabricated story: Compassion.) Anyway, your descriptions give me compassion for the world around me. Thank you.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Some detectives work years before they crack a case. My case is not a matter of finding a key piece of evidence. It’s a matter of careful observations and organizing the mounting evidence. Will there be a clear conviction? Don’t know.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. It is quite the experience being around a child that’s keen to learn. First hand experiences motivate him. Loves new challenges. We regularly hear his motto, “But I Can Do It,” any time we offer to lend him a hand when we see him struggling with something.

      Liked by 1 person

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