Scary Decision

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I need a different kind of ‘training wheels’

My bucket list includes cycling across the continent. I hope to make this a reality in the summer of 2017 by signing on to Sea to Sea 2017. However, I am still learning to live with ABI  (acquired brain injury). For those who have followed my recent journey, I’ve had to learn a lot about what I can reasonably take on.  Still figuring out my limitations has made me question whether a 10 week bike tour across the continent is achievable or even advisable.

Ever since the summer of 2013 I had my heart set on cycling across the continent. That summer I cycled from Lake Michigan to Montreal, a distance of 1400 km. I completed 250 km of the distance by unicycle. The balance of the 1400 km were completed on two wheels. The sheer enjoyment and success of the two week trip made me dream of one day biking across the continent.

On a good day I have been dropping hints with my family of my dream. On not so good days the thought of committing to this event has me downright scared. And so I vacillated from day to day, from week to week.

Pre-training

You could say I started my training last spring. I could not bike five kilometers without getting side effects of my ABI. By reducing my pace to about half of my pre-ABI pace I could manage five kilometers. Soon I was edging my distance up by five more kilometers, then ten more kilometers. On a very good day I could manage twenty kilometers. A couple months back I completed several forty kilometer trips. Still a far cry from the 130 kilometers I would need to do to take on the Sea to Sea tour.

During the heat of the summer I limited my cycling to late afternoons and cloudy days. With more than forty days that exceeded 30 C (85F) there were many days I stayed off the bike.

It’s almost like going back to ‘training wheels’. Through careful planning and training advice from my ‘brain coach’ I should be able to participate.

Pro

The things that encourage me to go will hopefully win out. The tour provides SAG support so I will not be left stranded if I have a bad day. It being a supported tour I will not have to carry my own gear. My experience with the previous tour is one of support and encouragement.

Cycling is one of the ways I cope with my ABI symptoms. I bike to help to help reduce my sensory overload or reduce fatigue brought on by stress and cognitive demands. I trust that I will continue to increase my biking distance. It’s not a race so I need to find a comfortable cycling pace.

In thinking back on my two week tour of 2013, cycling is one way to live a simplified life. Each day consists of some variation of ‘eat, sleep, bike’. The occasional extras would include pitching in with some of the group tasks.

Con

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East of Kingston Ontario, August 2013

Aside from getting to the starting point of the tour, Vancouver, there are other concerns while on the tour. Will I be able to handle the heat? According to the Farmers Almanac the temperatures should be more moderate next summer. Will I be able to handle touring with a large group, large gatherings for breakfast and supper and the daily peleton meetings?

Deciders

I signed on to Sea to Sea 2017 this week. I have 7 months in which to see improvement in learning to live with ABI. I need to accept the real possibility that there might be days in which it will be best to not cycle. That will be the biggest challenge – convincing myself to stay off the bike if I’m not up to it for a day.

One part of my decision is clear. I will not do any part of the 2017 tour by unicycle. Unlike the summer of 2013, for the tour in 2017 I have no intention of doing part of it by unicycle. Living with ABI means I will have enough challenges to respond to and manage that I don’t need to create any artificial challenges. I will welcome the support I received in 2013, but this time for very different reasons.

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Author: Jasper Hoogendam

I have been working in the field of elementary education since 1980 till my career ended due to a TBI. Renewable energy as part of 'walking lightly on this earth' has been and continues to be my interest since my teen years. Since early 2015 I have been learning to live with ABI (Acquire Brain Injury). In sharing my day to day successes and struggles, I am better able to understand how my life had changed and begin to accept the change. In sharing my experiences I'm hearing from caregivers and fellow ABI's. I'm encouraged when my experiences are helping others understand some of the complexity of living with ABI.

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