Stumbling onto a Living Assist

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The Shine of a New Vehicle

I have been learning to live with an ABI (acquired brain injury) as a result of a motor vehicle collision. The journey of recovery started a little over 4 years ago.

Initially, one of the key challenges was driving or simply being a passenger in a motor vehicle. I eventually was diagnosed with PTSD symptomology related the collision. Being in a car for a period of time would put me into sensory overload. It wasn’t that I was hesitant to get into a car. It was the toll the low level stress or anxiety that would build each time a vehicle would approach. The bigger the vehicle the greater the effect. Whether I’m the passenger or the driver the results would be similar. Being on a divided highway helped to mitigate some of the effects.

Initially I could not tolerate any trip  over 30 km. Gradually I could manage longer trips by taking a break every 100 km. It meant having to plan each trip carefully. Not to mention that taking trips took much longer than pre-accident.

Noting Progress

Gradually the out of town weekend trips to family became less demanding. In the first couple years I would spend two to four days to recover. I would be reasonably recovered in time for the trip home. Gradually I would not need as long a recovery time once I reached my destination. At times, if the weather cooperated I would complete the last part of a trip by biking the last part of the trip. The invigorating exercise of biking the last 40 or 50 km would reset my body by clearing enough of the stress build up to allow me to visit rather than taking a nap as soon as I arrived. (Needless to say the biking strategy doesn’t work too well in the winter months.)

I have also done some solo out of town trips by car. I would work out an alternate plan if I could not complete the trip. One time I under estimated my level of endurance without having set up an alternate plan. I had to arrange for someone to come and get me as I was unable to drive home.

Some More Progress

A little over a year ago I did a number of longer trips with very encouraging results. I was still taking a break every 100 km or so but was arriving at my destination with much less sensory loading. This was very encouraging. I did not notice the change at first. Then again  I’ve learned to expect the unexpected. Sometimes a challenging situation goes unexpectedly well. Other times it goes in the opposite direction.

A Noticeable Improvement

About a year ago I did a trip with a few brief stops, and then joined other family members for a restaurant meal. (Restaurants, even if they are not busy at the time, have their challenges for me, particularly the ordering process. Too many choices and then trying to focus while a waitress recites the specials for the day.)

Later that day it dawned on me that the combination of the drive and the restaurant experience had resulted in minimal neural fatigue. That prompted me to take a look at what had changed in my environment. I realized the biggest change had been in my driving environment. The trip to our family usually involves driving through a metropolitan area of over 6 million people, which had also been the case on this particular day.

Driving Assists

The more that is at stake the greater the fatigue. When it comes to driving one does not want to make an error. The consequences could be life altering. So the need to remain focused while driving is paramount.

With the new car we purchased about a year ago, it included a feature called pre-collision. When the cruise control is activated the pre-collision feature can also be engaged. With the pre-collision engaged the car automatically adjusts to the flow of traffic. Driving in stop and go traffic is very effectively handled by the car.

Without the pre-collision there are just too many things to stay focused on.  Watching for  the vehicle ahead of me. Responding with the right amount of braking and acceleration to maintain a safe gap. In stop and go traffic this can quickly become too demanding. (There is a reason why a high percentage of collisions happen each day during the morning and evening  commute.) With the pre-collision I still need to keep a close eye on things, particularly watching out for vehicles that suddenly cut in front of me. The pre-collision system doesn’t respond quick enough when someone cuts too close in front of me.

The pre-collision removes one of the biggest components that causes me neural fatigue while driving, the constant need to remain focused. At the same time it reduces the risk of an accident. This reduced risk was borne out by the car insurance quotes I received when I took delivery of the new car.

A Safer Car

The car we took off the road was a 15 year old Elantra without collision coverage. We insured a brand new car with the same coverage plus collision. The cost was a couple of dollars cheaper to insure the new car. (All other factors such as geographic area, claims record, number of demerit points etc were unchanged.) I was pleasantly surprised because I had definitely expected to pay a slightly higher premium.

If the question was put to me, “Are you a proponent of ‘self driving’ cars?” my answer would be a clear “no”. I think there are issues when choices are taken away from the driver due to automation. (Think of the Boeing 737 Max 8.)

The driving assist that was a standard part of our new car purchase has improved my quality of life. A benefit that I had never considered but have warmly welcomed.

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Author: Jasper Hoogendam

After 36 years as an educator my career ended due to a TBI. Renewable energy as part of 'walking lightly on this earth' has been and continues to be my interest since my teen years. Since early 2015 I have been learning to live with ABI (Acquire Brain Injury). I don't want to let my ABI limit the goals I set for myself. I'm living with a different brain, not a lesser brain. In sharing my day to day successes and struggles, I am better able to understand how my life had changed and begin to accept the change. In sharing my experiences I'm hearing from caregivers and fellow ABI's. I'm encouraged when my experiences are helping others understand some of the complexity of living with ABI.

2 thoughts on “Stumbling onto a Living Assist”

  1. Any changes, internal or external, that help improve quality of life are exciting. Thanks for sharing. Your sharing gives hope and courage to others in challenging situations. Your “keep going” , “keep discovering” attitude is so important for all of us, not matter what challenges we face. You continue to be an educator.

    Liked by 1 person

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